Meet the New ECHO Interns!

Introducing...the freshest faces at ECHO! Savannah and Imanuel (Feo) bring so many new ideas and opportunities to the farm. Learn more about their backgrounds, passions and goals, in this Q and A!

Q: What brought you to ECHO?

 Savannah: “I took a mission trip to Peru for a year between high school and college as a gap year and that’s when I decided God was calling me to missions work. So I came back and went to Liberty University. After a year I did a mission trip with NMSI to Zimbabwe. We did community development and appropriate technology. We came here to ECHO to get trained and that’s when I decided I wanted to do missions work with agricultural development and appropriate technology. And I’ve been pursuing that ever since.”

 Feo: “I never had a dream to become a farmer but my dad has a small organization working with farmers. Before I graduated from high school, my dad told me, ‘Maybe agriculture is a good fit for you because everyone has to eat eventually, so that’s probably a good start if you don’t have a dream.’ I never thought about becoming a missionary but I do know that every Christian has to share the Gospel and work with the poor and work with the community around them so it has been my goal to go back to my country and maybe start an agriculture business that is more focused on the community.”

 Q: What was the first thing you noticed about ECHO?

 Savannah: “I really like how they teach how to do things. They don’t lecture a whole lot. They just have you do it and teach as you’re going.”

 Feo: “It is very community based.”

Q: What is one thing you have learned since coming to ECHO?

 Savannah: “I learned to set up a biogas digester and all the important functions of it. That is a way of taking food scraps and manure and creating a place where bacteria can convert that into a gas that we can store and use for cooking fires.”

 Feo: “I learned that working on a farm that has more diversity is way more fun. Different plants have different needs and different kinds of fruits and stuff like that so it’s more fun.”

 Q: If you could have any pet, what would you pick?

 Savannah: “I really enjoyed keeping fish when I was younger. I kept an aquarium with tropical aquarium fish.”

 Feo: “I don’t really like dogs very much. I like puppies. I’d like to get puppies that never grow up.”

Q: Any favorite ECHO food so far?

 Savannah: “I had figs and lychees yesterday. Those were both pretty awesome.”

 Feo: “The peanut butter chaya was pretty good too.”

 Q: What change do you hope to see in the world?

 Savannah: “I’d like to see more resources available to people. Especially overseas. I think we have a lot of resources available to us in the U.S. Everything is in English. But overseas they don’t have it in their language or they don't have internet access or books.”

 Feo: “It would be nice if people could have an understanding of where their food comes from so people appreciate food.


ECHO’s internship is a paid, 14-month long program. ECHO is looking for college graduates interested in international community development and small-scale tropical agriculture or appropriate technologies. Click here for more information.

 

From Around the World to Your Backyard, ECHO Provides Assistance to Local Gardeners

Building on Expert Experience, the ECHO Global Farm Provides Resources to Local Community Gardeners

Through the Community Garden Assistance Program, ECHO offers resources such as basic trainings and consultation for local garden projects. 

A unique perspective that ECHO brings to the domestic community gardening is shaped by their work with small-scale farmers in many of the poorest regions of the world.  ECHO seeks to provide an opportunity for practical and affordable ideas to be shared and communicated across the globe and at home.

 A brightly colored sign greets visitors to the active community garden located on ECHO’s Global Farm in the Buckingham area of Fort Myers, FL.(photo by: Bianca Ross)

A brightly colored sign greets visitors to the active community garden located on ECHO’s Global Farm in the Buckingham area of Fort Myers, FL.(photo by: Bianca Ross)

 Dozens of perennials, fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices grow in this relatively small garden space tended by the community garden intern. Like ECHO farmers around the world, she uses techniques to maximize space and work within the environment. (photo by: Bianca Ross)

Dozens of perennials, fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices grow in this relatively small garden space tended by the community garden intern. Like ECHO farmers around the world, she uses techniques to maximize space and work within the environment. (photo by: Bianca Ross)

  At one end of the community garden, Bouquet Dill and hot peppers grow in recycled tires. Container gardening is an inexpensive and feasible option in areas with little or no access to arable ground. (photo by: Bianca Ross)

 At one end of the community garden, Bouquet Dill and hot peppers grow in recycled tires. Container gardening is an inexpensive and feasible option in areas with little or no access to arable ground. (photo by: Bianca Ross)

 Tomatoes ripen on this 84 degree Florida Day. Community gardens are meant to be beneficial to those around them, this one provides nuritious food. (Photo By: Bianca Ross)

Tomatoes ripen on this 84 degree Florida Day. Community gardens are meant to be beneficial to those around them, this one provides nuritious food. (Photo By: Bianca Ross)

 Community gardens improve neighborhoods. They foster community, promote intergenerational learning, provide supplemental food for individual households, and provide life skills training.(photo by: Bianca Ross)

Community gardens improve neighborhoods. They foster community, promote intergenerational learning, provide supplemental food for individual households, and provide life skills training.(photo by: Bianca Ross)

To learn more about the Community Garden Assistance Program with ECHO please visit our site:

Literally... From Farm to Table Today

In our modern food system, convenience foods are the norm. In stark contrast, this week, interns at ECHO are eating only foods that they have grown on the farm. It's time consuming and takes lots of creativity, but the results are delicious! Imagine eating tilapia that you harvested that morning with tepary beans and rice that you threshed just days prior.  Could you do it?

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